Staying Hydrated

Our Guide to Staying Hydrated

Our bodies are made up of roughly 60% water. All of our major organs rely are impacted by fluid balance. We need water to transport nutrients to our organs and cells. It carried toxins away, helps to regulate body temperature and greatly improves brain function.

Bottom line is we need water to survive.

How much water do we actually need?

How much we need really depends on how active we are. The average recommended amount for women is around 2.7 Litres and about 3.7 Litres for women.

This can fluctuate depending on how warm the weather might be, if you’re breastfeeding and if you’re exercising a lot.

Hydration Choices

Around 80% of our water needs come from fluids such as water, milk and tea. The other 20% comes from high-water foods like fruit, vegetables and yoghurt.

Examples of foods include:

  • Cucumber
  • Cabbage
  • Zucchini
  • Lettuce
  • Celery
  • Low-sodium beef, chicken and vegetable broth
  • Tomatoes
  • Asparagus
  • Bell Peppers
  • Radishes

Hydration and Exercise

The harder and longer you work out during exercise, the more water you lose. But, water isn’t the only thing that escapes us during exercise. While working out you should consume 250ml of fluid for every 20 minutes of exercise.

We also lose important electrolytes – sodium and potassium. Add a sports drink or electrolyte supplement while you’re working out and after your work out. Particularly if you sweat a lot or your work out lasts longer than 45 minutes.

Signs of Dehydration:

  • Constipation
  • Thirst
  • Fatigue & Irritability
  • Brain fog
  • Rapid or Irregular heartbeat
  • Dizziness
  • Headaches
  • Joint Pain
  • Elevated Body Temperature

Tips for staying Hydrated:

  • Monitor urine colour
  • Keep a bottle of water in your eye sight near you.
  • Track your water intake
  • Fruit Infusers are a good way to keep things interesting with the taste of water.

By |2019-03-29T16:56:14+00:00March 29th, 2019|Food & Diet, General Health, General Practice, Sports Medicine|